Category Archives: Talks

Joined up Heritage Sheffield – Jon Bradley – 19th November 2018

Sheffield, from its begin­nings as a small market town through to today, is a city with an inter­na­tional repu­ta­tion for industry, com­merce and sport steeped in his­tory. It has a her­it­age to be proud of and envied by many. Heritage can be seen as a series of step­ping stones to where we are today, but sadly we don’t make the most of ourselves in com­par­ison to our noisy neigh­bours like Bradford, Leeds and Manchester.

The Botanical Gardens

Joined up Heritage Sheffield is an organ­isa­tion chaired by Jon Bradley and launched in October 2017 with a major aim of making sure our her­it­age is cel­eb­rated loc­ally, region­ally and nation­ally. A broad range of organ­isa­tions and indi­vidu­als rep­res­ent­ing Sheffield’s very diverse her­it­age sector have come together to explore ways to develop a better resourced, better con­nec­ted and better com­mu­nic­ated her­it­age offer to a wide range of audi­ences.

The Bishop’s House

Heritage is big busi­ness, with over 75 per cent of adults vis­it­ing his­tor­ical sites, and it is estim­ated that it is respons­ible for put­ting £20.6 bil­lion into the UK eco­nomy. Tourism is a grow­ing industry, and Sheffield must take full advant­age of its his­tory and repu­ta­tion. History along­side modern set­tings make desir­able places for people to live and work, also attract­ing indus­tries and start-ups. Preserving our her­it­age and his­tor­ical sites also pre­vents the growth of identical, con­crete cities with high rise flats and modern, bland archi­tec­ture.

Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet

Joined up Heritage Sheffield brings together her­it­age part­ners or stake­hold­ers in a co-ordinated and stra­tegic fash­ion. Funds are lim­ited but applic­a­tion has been made to the Charities Commission. The city’s her­it­age must be pro­moted far and wide, and Jon and his asso­ci­ates will need all their pas­sion, com­mit­ment and mar­ket­ing skills to do justice to the his­tory of Sheffield and to achieve any degree of suc­cess. However, there is plenty to cel­eb­rate includ­ing Kelham Island, Bishops’ House, the Botanical Gardens and Abbeydale Industrial Museum, as well as knife, cut­lery and tool man­u­fac­tur­ing, water power, rivers and canals. Beauchief Abbey, the General Cemetery, the Cathedral, Sheffield Castle, Manor Lodge are other examples to inspire and attract vis­it­ors.

Good com­mu­nic­a­tions will be vital, and Joined up Heritage Sheffield is using all means avail­able includ­ing the web­site www.joinedupheritagesheffield.org.uk, news­let­ters, com­munity forums, local his­tory fairs, con­fer­ences and stake­holder (part­ners’) meet­ings to spread the mes­sage. This is a big but worth­while chal­lenge to ensure Sheffield’s his­tory is not for­got­ten but used in a very pos­it­ive way to pro­mote it along­side the vir­tues a very modern city. Today’s Sheffield can be traced back through those step­ping stones to its past. Clearly, Jon and his asso­ci­ates have plenty of her­it­age to join up and mem­bers of Stumperlowe Probus Club wish them suc­cess and await the res­ults with great interest.

Clipper Round the World Race — Martin Greenshields — 12th November 2018

 

THE Clipper Race, first held in 1996–97 and the brainchild of solo round-the-world yachts­man Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, is con­tested by 12 identical yachts, each with a pro­fes­sional skip­per but crewed by a com­bined total of 700 ama­teur sail­ors.

Martin Greenshields is very much one of the ama­teurs. Before embark­ing on this 10,000 naut­ical mile adven­ture of a life­time, his sail­ing exper­i­ence, he admit­ted, con­sisted of one after­noon on Carsington Reservoir.

But  bravely under­tak­ing the first two legs of the global chal­lenge — from Liverpool to Punta del Este in Uruguay, and then back across the Atlantic to Cape Town — wasn’t quite as reck­less as it might at first appear. All the ama­teur crews had to embark on four sep­ar­ate weeks of train­ing at Gosport to turn them from novices to com­pet­ent crew mem­bers, learn­ing the basic skills of seaman­ship as well as under­go­ing sea sur­vival courses and ‘man over­board’ train­ing.

Recruits were then alloc­ated places on one or other of the 12 identical 70-foot ves­sels which make up the world’s largest matched fleet of ocean racing yachts. Martin, a retired account­ant who lives on Redmires Road, was accep­ted for the 2017–18 race as a crew member of the Sanya Serenity Coast, skippered by 53-year-old Australian sailor Wendy Tuck, from Sydney.

The boat, which went on to win the over­all race, was sponsored by the Chinese city of Sanya, a hol­i­day des­tin­a­tion on the south­ern tip of Hainan Island.

Clipper 70s are not for the faint-hearted, or the work shy. They are stripped of all lux­ur­ies. Crew must become experts at hand­ling the boat as well as living in a con­fined space, man­aging all their kit and belong­ings as they settle into their new home. We saw dra­matic onboard foot­age of the yachts encoun­ter­ing massive seas, with the hori­zon tilt­ing crazily.

Martin was quot­ing Sir Robin Knox-Johnston when he said: “In a Clipper 70 you have everything you need to sail around the world, and noth­ing you don’t need.”

The open­ing leg from Liverpool to Punta del Este involved 32 days’ sail­ing, with the 22 crew shar­ing a round-the-clock watch system with the days split into five seg­ments. Off watch, crew mem­bers could catch up on their sleep either on deck or in one of the avail­able bunks .

In the Tropics, the tem­per­at­ure down below could reach 40 deg C, so it wasn’t very good for sleep­ing,” Martin explained. Another obstacle to over­come, espe­cially in the early stages, was sea sick­ness, although Martin man­aged to restrict this to one ses­sion.

As the Sanya Serenity Coast reached halfway on the first leg across the Atlantic, Martin wrote in his diary, pub­lished on the race’s web­site: “The last few days have been noisy, with the con­stant trim­ming of the spin­naker as we seek to squeeze every last knot out of the boat. Now we are through the scor­ing gate, we are on course south to the motor­ing cor­ridor, where we are allowed to turn on the motor for 60 hours, but only 60 hours, to get through the dreaded Doldrums. Once through that, which may be a prob­lem as they are very large this year, it is a ‘sprint’ (prob­ably almost two weeks) to the finish.

The crew have agreed that I can do the blog today to ask you a favour. In a feeble attempt to regain some of the many house points lost recently at home, I did remem­ber to buy a present for my wife for our wed­ding anniversary on Monday. However, I forgot to tell her, or any­body else, where I put it. So, if there is any­body read­ing this who knows Penny, could you please tell her it’s on the seat of the car in the garage? Thanks.”

On Day 27 he wrote: “After what seems like many months at sea, we have noted a dis­tinct change in the morale of the crew. This all eman­ates from the inspir­a­tional words of Wendo [skip­per Wendy Tuck].

Early in the leg, her legendary pep talks went along the lines of ‘just don’t break any­thing.’ As the race con­tin­ued we were given strict instruc­tions, ‘drive it like you stole it.’ Now, how­ever, the time has come for the words we all needed to get us through to Punta. ‘Think of the moji­tos, smell the BBQ.’

With these words we powered ahead, the Doldrums far behind us and all the excite­ment of spin­nakers to keep us occu­pied.”

As we approach the final days of what we under­stand is the longest open­ing leg in Clipper Race his­tory, strange things have been hap­pen­ing on the boat. Jan Riley, our victu­aller has revealed that she is on Mother Duty tomor­row, Sunday, and we are to have roast beef.

She has, appar­ently, secreted all the neces­sary ingredi­ents around the boat and will be gath­er­ing them together for this spe­cial meal. The excite­ment amongst the crew is intense par­tic­u­larly as last night we had chicken curry that con­tained both chicken and curry. To top it off we found the spicy mango chut­ney for the first time so the curry depart­ment is firing on all cyl­in­ders at last.”

Applications are now open for the 2019–20 edi­tion of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race. Please remem­ber to men­tion Stumperlowe Probus Club when sub­mit­ting your entry.

5th Nov 2018 Toujours amis, Toujour unis. The story of the links between Sheffield. Bapaume and Serre by Sylvia Dunkley

This was an appro­pri­ate topic for the cen­ten­ary of the end of the First World War (WW1).

Before the WW1 Bapaume and the nearby hamlet of Serre were pros­per­ous towns and had good schools for edu­ca­tion.

When the war star­ted the town was a stra­tegic object­ive for the German army so they cap­tured it and were still occupy­ing the town in 1917.  The Germans then left and des­troyed all the infra­struc­ture of the area.  They returned later and set up camp in the Town Hall which was still stand­ing and used it for a while.  The Germans booby-trapped the build­ing before leav­ing once more and it was blown up, killing 30 people.

The town hall was rebuilt:

British shelling also con­trib­uted to the dev­ast­a­tion of the town.

Soldiers from the Sheffield Pals were dis­patched to France and their object­ive was to defeat the Germans at Serre.  There was a heavy bom­bard­ment which did not prove effect­ive so the Pals were ordered to “go over the top”.  Of the 600 Pals, 248 were killed, 200 wounded and 18 listed as miss­ing.  British tanks were aban­doned and all the inhab­it­ants of Bapaume left, some later to return living in cel­lars and bombed out houses.

After the war, in the 1920’s, the British League of Help for Devastation of France encour­aged British towns to adopt the bombed towns and Sheffield adop­ted Serre and Bapaume.

Notable Sheffield dig­nat­or­ies, such as Alderman Wardley, took on the task of set­ting up the French aid appeal.  Letters in the Sheffield Telegraph stated that Sheffield shells had des­troyed Bapaume so money-raising pro­jects were star­ted and  £4,800 (£250,000 in today’s money) was raised.  Money was set aside for a crèche and the build­ing of twelve cot­tages for dis­abled cit­izens.

A memorial was erec­ted on the road to Serre vil­lage.  This was in the form of a park and memorial shel­ter.  The shel­ter no longer exists.

Robert Hatfield donated a teak casket con­tain­ing a roll of honour naming 4890 Sheffield men lost in the con­flict.

George Lawrence, a Sheffield busi­ness­man who owned a razor blade fact­ory, provided money for the cause (loc­ally, he built the open-air pools at Hathersage and Longley Park).  He provided money for the crèche and, in July 1939, a party from Sheffield went to open it.  A plaque on the build­ing, com­mem­or­at­ing the con­nec­tion of Sheffield and Bapaume, is still there.

The mayor of Bapaume, Abel Gueidet, thanked the people of Sheffield for their help and presen­ted them with a large Sevres vase which is still in the council’s pos­ses­sion.  The teak casket, donated to Bapaume, was saved from destruc­tion by the wife of a care­taker who took it off a bon­fire and stored it in her attic.

Jackie Drayton, a Sheffield coun­cil­lor, went to Bapaume in 2006, found the memorial park and arranged to ren­ov­ate it.  In 2016 many Sheffield dig­nat­or­ies went to Bapaume to com­mem­or­ate the Battle of the Somme and viewed the refur­bished memorial.

Finally, in March 2018, the Mayor of Bapaume came to Sheffield to thank Sheffield cit­izens for their kind help in help­ing to restore the town, and viewed the large Sevres vase which had been donated by the pre­vi­ous mayor.

The talk was very inter­est­ing and mem­bers asked many ques­tions and some had dis­tant rel­at­ives who had been  in the “War to End All Wars”.

What a shame that wasn’t so, and still after WW2 many lives are still being lost and fam­il­ies made home­less by numer­ous con­flicts all over the world.

Stan Hirst

 

Carbon Dioxide as a commodity and not a problem waste by Professor Peter Styring 29th October 2018

Peter Styring became Prof. of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the University of Sheffield in 2007.  He gradu­ated at Sheffield then worked at Hull and New York State uni­ver­sit­ies.  He is an expert in Carbon Capture & Utilisation (CCU).  He is the author of “Carbon Capture and Utilisation in the Green Economy” and is Chair of the CO2Chem Network.

His talk began with provid­ing evid­ence that it is CO2 that is the major con­trib­utor to global warm­ing by show­ing a series of “hockey stick” graphs show­ing the global effects of vari­ous sus­pec­ted con­trib­ut­ors.  Deforestation has noth­ing like the effect that it is com­monly thought have and simply plant­ing more trees will not in itself solve the prob­lem. Similarly, the Ozone layer has only a small effect and aer­o­sols have a neg­li­gible effect.

He then moved on to how CO2 is a “green­house gas” and a cli­mate change accel­er­ator.  A prob­lem is that fossil fuels take mil­lions of years to create and seconds to des­troy.  He is con­vinced that the gen­er­a­tion of fossil fuel use for our elec­tri­city, heat­ing, indus­trial pro­duc­tion and trans­port is det­ri­mental.  To mit­ig­ate against this requires: Government policy; life cycle aware­ness & sus­tain­ab­il­ity; cre­ation of new chem­ic­als, pro­cesses and indus­tries.

 

Peter intro­duced the Linsink Waste Hierarchy concept:-

Waste hier­archy is a tool used in the eval­u­ation of pro­cesses that pro­tect the envir­on­ment along­side resource and energy con­sump­tion to most favour­able to least favour­able actions

The top of the pyr­amid is to use no new fossil fuels and the lowest level is to bury the prob­lem.

At the IPCC con­fer­ence in Korea we received a dire warn­ing “to reduce the rate of global warm­ing to a max­imum of 1.5 0C per annum and we have only 10 years to save the planet”.

Peter is con­vinced that legis­la­tion alone is not the answer and solu­tions that create a “profit” are a prac­tical approach.  Taking inspir­a­tion from Sir Fraser Stoddard, he believes in using CO2 to make things.  Peter Medawar speaks of “some­thing to be clever about” to create a world where there is no sur­plus CO2.  Peter covered many aspects of CO2 util­isa­tion and in par­tic­u­lar, vari­ous forms of trans­port.  He thinks there is a big future for the mass pro­duc­tion of Dimethyl Ether.  This liquid is a sub­sti­tute for diesel and is already used for some goods vehicles in Canada and the US.  For a small cost, diesel engines can be con­ver­ted to use DME with no emis­sion pol­lut­ants.  This is a much better method of cap­tur­ing CO2 and prob­ably much less costly than stor­ing it under the North Sea.

This was a spell bind­ing talk given by an inter­na­tional expert that cuts through some of the mis-information that is around today.

An Indian Wildlife Journey                  by Malcom Walpole 22nd Oct 2018

Malcolm showed a present­a­tion with hun­dreds of pho­to­graphs of anim­als that he saw on his jour­ney.

India’s wild­life is totally dif­fer­ent from African wild­life and although India draws tour­ists to see the cul­ture, Taj Mahal etc. the wild­life is also well worth seeing.

At the first National Park on his travels he pho­to­graphed Asiatic lions.  These are dif­fer­ent from African lions, although the females do the killing and the males turn up to eat the prey.  There are only about 250 indi­vidu­als in the park.  They hunt in dark­ness and prey on Samba deer, which are also hunted by tigers.  These deer were seen feed­ing whilst stand­ing in metre-deep water, pre­sum­ably to stay safe from pred­at­ors.

He also saw Spotted deer, which are more common.  They seem to have a sym­bi­otic rela­tion­ship with Langur mon­keys, because when the deer give warn­ing of danger the mon­keys climb trees to safety then throw down foliage for the deer to eat.

There were pho­to­graphs of many birds: Red-wattled lap­wings, Plum-headed para­keets and Kingfishers (which were identical to the ones seen in England).  There were also Blue peafowl, which are common in India, but Malcolm said they seemed much quieter than the ones we might see in zoos or stately home parks here.

On the way to the second National Park Malcolm was fas­cin­ated by the vari­ety of dif­fer­ent modes of trans­port, par­tic­u­larly the bul­lock carts, which have been used in India for cen­tur­ies.

This National Park was cre­ated to pro­tect the Black-backed ante­lope.  There are no lions, tigers or leo­pards in this park.  The main pred­at­ors are a few grey wolves but the ante­lopes are much too fast for them.  There are also jungle cats, but they prey on smal­ler anim­als as they are only the size of our domestic cats.  Here again was a healthy bird pop­u­la­tion: Montague har­ri­ers, common kestrels, Black-shouldered kites and eagles.

The next stop was at a salt desert to see the Indian wild ass.  This salt desert bor­ders Pakistan.  The asses manage to eke out a living from the salt scrub.

The local people drill down to the water table and salt water rises up to the sur­face, where it is dir­ec­ted into shal­low ponds.  Here the water evap­or­ates in the sun to leave salt.  This is a thriv­ing local industry.  There are also some fresh-water lakes which are home to many bird spe­cies: Storks, Eurasian spoon­bills, pel­ic­ans, night­jars, rock pigeons and Sarus cranes.

Next he went to a for­ti­fied town (Kishen?) where a man was spread­ing sacks and sacks of grain out on the ground.  Soon there was a huge flight of hun­dreds and hun­dreds of Demsol cranes head­ing towards the town and coming in to land.  Lots of pigeons also landed and began to eat the grain but moved away when the cranes came.  The ground became covered in cranes, so closely bunched that there was no spaces between them.  As soon as all the grain was eaten all the cranes flew away.  The grain was sup­plied by local res­id­ents and the ‘hap­pen­ing’ is a famous tour­ist attrac­tion.

Malcolm trav­elled to see the Taj Mahal, then on to the Ganges river basin where he cruised along­side the banks to look at the wild­life.  There was the Galiah? cro­codile, which is the largest in the world.  It can grow to 6 metres in length and weigh over 1 ton.

It is so heavy that it cannot raise its body off the ground so it slides along on its belly when it is on land.  It feeds on fish.  Here again Malcolm saw and pho­to­graphed other cro­codiles and turtles and many, many birds.

He moved on to tiger coun­try where he went out with park staff on elephant-back to see tigers lying in the shade of the forest.  He saw a male tiger being ‘herded’ by an ele­phant and riders.  It was fol­lowed by many tour­ists in jeeps and was obvi­ously annoyed.

However, 15 minutes later it came strolling back, having dodged the ele­phant and the crowds, and Malcolm got his pho­to­graphs.

He ended his trip in Assam where he saw water buf­falo, which can weigh up to 1200kg and have the largest horns of any bovine, and the Indian one-horned rhino­ceros, which is a pro­tec­ted spe­cies.  There are now only about 1000 rhino left and they are still tar­geted by poach­ers for their horns, which are sup­posed to be an aph­ro­dis­iac.

(He also saw lots of birds!)

It was a very well organ­ised present­a­tion, with beau­ti­ful pho­to­graphy.

The Peak District in the Mid-1900s By Tim Knebel 15th October 2018

Tim is a volun­teer local arch­iv­ist for ‘’Peak in the Past’’ which is a com­munity her­it­age group com­pris­ing a small col­lect­ive of indi­vidu­als with a shared pas­sion for the Derbyshire Peak District and its past. Teaming up with his High Peak Journalist sister Holly, Tim has, from humble begin­nings in 2014, obtained fin­an­cial sup­port to enable the group to work with school­chil­dren, inspir­ing and enga­ging them in their local his­tory, through to eld­erly res­id­ents in res­id­en­tial care homes, gath­er­ing remin­is­cences. With gen­eral his­tory from ori­ginal archive sources, the group gives talks & has made films to reflect & con­trib­ute towards the import­ant sense of regional belong­ing, pride & iden­tity, to help strengthen & enrich com­munity cohe­sion.

The excel­lent illus­trated talk focused on local his­tory and com­munity events, rooted in the real lives of hard work­ing, some­times impov­er­ished rural folk, where the chances to travel away, were not as they are today.

Some past vil­lage cel­eb­ra­tions that occurred in the mid 1900s, high­lighted in the talk, were :-

  • Empire Day on 24th May, which was Queen Victorias’ birth­day and sub­sequently became Commonwealth Day on Queen Elizabeth IIs’ birth­day.
  • May Day, which is dying out
  • The Wakes e.g. on the dates of the Patron Saints of the local Churches
  • Well Dressings, still pop­u­lar
  • Festivals, Fetes, Carnivals, Garland Days, some now gone
  • Bakewell Show, star­ted in 1819, and Bakewell Carnival.
  • The choos­ing of Miss Village from the local beau­ties.

Schools held a more prom­in­ent role in the smal­ler com­munit­ies. Corporal pun­ish­ment was meted out at school & the chil­dren were sub­jec­ted to some­times tough regimes.

The churches were more at the centres of com­munity life with Sunday schools, choirs, girl guides, scouts, womens’ groups, fest­ivals, and sports teams of cricket, foot­ball, tennis, and tug-o-war.

In the smal­ler com­munit­ies enter­tain­ment was avail­able in the form of cinemas, Whist Drives, and theatre, in par­tic­u­lar the legendary Great Hucklow Village Players (1927–71) foun­ded by Dr. Du Guard Peach, which had a world­wide repu­ta­tion.

Pubs, Clubs and Institutes played a major part in vil­lage life, with Ex-Servicemens clubs, and the Mechanical Institute of Eyam prom­in­ent. There was a vil­lage police­man sup­por­ted by Special Constables from volun­teers in the vil­lage, and local emer­gency fire and ambu­lance ser­vices with cot­tage hos­pit­als in nearby larger towns.

WW2 brought evacu­ees to the area, and the Nightingale Institute for Guernsey evacu­ees at Great Hucklow was foun­ded. POW camps were set up in Stoney Middleton and the quarry was bombed to try to stop pro­duc­tion, even though some of the work­ers were POWs. Bombs were also stored at Stoney Middleton.

There was the inev­it­able loss of life amongst those who joined up for both world wars, remembered with prom­in­ent monu­ments and reg­u­lar memorial ser­vices.

Transport devel­op­ments changed hori­zons, with the Railway, cars, & sub­sequent road improve­ments. Winnats Pass was sur­faced in the 1930s & the AA man with his motor­bike and side­car appeared. The horse and cart deliv­ery meth­ods were dying out.

Attitudes were chan­ging and the Kinder Trespass took place in 1932. More leis­ure time was being taken which lead to Caving, Rambling, Climbing, and the first National Park in 1951.

Employment was centred around mining, espe­cially for lead and fluor­spar. Farming and agri­cul­ture and the mills at Bamford (closed 1965), Litton (1960), and Cressbrook (1971) were big employ­ers. The Hope Cement Works since 1945 is still a big pro­du­cer and employer.

There is a time­less splend­our to the Peak District, even with the pres­sures on it, like the flood­ing of Ashopton in the Derwent valley, to con­struct the dams, but the talk show­cased how an import­ant cul­tural her­it­age role is help­ing to pre­serve the past in the Peak District, which is integ­ral to its endur­ing appeal, its con­tin­ued envir­on­mental pro­tec­tion and its long-term sur­vival.

We’re very lucky to have volun­teers like Tim doing this work. More power to your elbow!

A most enjoy­able morn­ing.

For more inform­a­tion (and a few phrases cribbed from it) go to :-

www.peakinthepast.co.uk      e-mail for con­tact  info@peakinthepast.co.uk