Category Archives: Talks

Beekeeping. Peter Miles. 10th December 2018

The Honey Bee Show                 Peter Miles

 

Peter has been a bee-keeper for over 45 years and is still find­ing out how bees do what they do.

 

Imagine a com­puter that can fly, can nav­ig­ate to the inch over a dis­tance of ~7 miles and also con­tains a chem­ical fact­ory inside it.  This is a worker honey bee.

 

Honey bee work­ers col­lect nectar, pollen, water and propilis (a sticky resin).

Honey bees are dif­fer­ent from bumble bees.  Honey bees make honey to feed them over the winter, but bumble bees dont — they all die except the queen.

 

There is only one queen in the honey bee hive.  She is fed by the worker bees as she cannot feed her­self.  Her role is to pro­duce eggs to stock the hive with more bees.  A queen can lay up to 2000 eggs in a day so she needs a lot of food

 

There are many male bees, called drones.  Their role is simply to mate with the queen.

This mating takes place during a flight!  Several drones will mate with the queen on this flight. The drones gen­italia are ripped off during this mating and the drones die.  How lucky are the drones, who fol­lowed the queen in this flight, but never man­aged to mate!

 

Honey bee work­ers make the hexagonal cells in the hon­ey­combs from wax that is made by the bees them­selves. The bees must con­sume 8oz. of honey to make 1oz. of wax. 

The cells are used to store honey.  Honey is made from nectar, which is con­cen­trated by remov­ing water.  It is then filled into cells which are capped by wax made by the bel­lies of the work­ers from honey and chem­ic­als from inside the bees.  The caps are stuck on using propilis. 

Some cells are used as a breed­ing area where the eggs laid by the queen become larvae, then pupae, and then new bees. 

Pollen is also stored in the cells to feed the larvae.

The work­ers col­lect nectar and pollen to make larvae bread, which is absorbed by the larvae so they grow and pupate and emerge and are then fed by the work­ers.  After 12 days they get their wings and go out col­lect­ing in their turn.  Some of the work­ers stay at the exit to the hive and fan their wings to provide vent­il­a­tion to the hive.

Some work­ers act as guards to pro­tect the hive from pred­at­ors and other dangers.

 

On these col­lec­tion flights the bees are very import­ant pol­lin­at­ors of plants.  They also col­lect water to take back to the hive to reg­u­late the humid­ity and to dilute the food for the larvae.  A worker that has found a good source of nectar and pollen goes back to the hive and per­forms a wiggle dance to inform the rest of the work­ers of the dir­ec­tion and dis­tance to this new source.  The bees com­mu­nic­ate is this way because there is no light in the hive.  The other work­ers take on enough fuel to reach the source and follow the dir­ec­tions, 40 degrees to the Sun and 1.2 miles know­ing there will be enough fuel there for the return jour­ney. 

 

A bee can pro­tect itself by using its sting.  It will usu­ally attack the eyes and the ankles.

The sting is a sharp prong with a barbed tip.  The sting base is in a mus­cu­lar poison sac but when the bee stings the barbed tip causes the sac to be pulled out and the bee dies.

 

When the hive gets full and becomes crowded the queen will lay some queen eggs.  These egg larvae are fed with royal jelly until one pupates and  is ready to emerge.

When the new queen is born it kills the other queen cells by sting­ing them.

 

The old queen then vacates the hive, taking with her about half the hive pop­u­la­tion in a swarm.  They dont go far and often can be found hanging in a mass on a tree branch with the queen in the middle sur­roun­ded by her swarm.  They never go back to the ori­ginal hive, as if they have for­got­ten the pass­word or it has been changed.

 

Bees see flowers by ultra violet light  and also follow odours given out by flowers.

Good plants for bees are willow herbs, brambles, thistles, dan­deli­ons and clovers, but most nectar is col­lec­ted from trees like hawthorn and syca­more.  Many other flower­ing plants are useful to bees and they will travel up to 4 miles to col­lect nectar.

 

Each worker bee in her life­time col­lects only enough nectar to pro­duce one tea­spoon­ful of honey, but that would fuel her to make a flight around the world.

A 12 oz. jar of honey con­tains 72 tea­spoon­ful of honey and to fill that jar would need 26,705 bee visits, an approx­im­ate flying dis­tance of 25.000 miles.

 

The female bees are given the name work­ers because they are:

Cleaners and hygien­ists, keep­ing the hive and combs as clean as oper­at­ing theatres
Heaters, using body heat to main­tain hive tem­per­at­ure
Feeders, of larvae, pupae and emer­ging new work­ers, and feed­ers of drones
Feeders and attend­ants of the queen
Wax pro­du­cers 
Comb build­ers
Nectar pro­cessors
Guards
Undertakers
Ventilators
Hydrators
Collectors of nectar, pollen water and propilis

 

The expres­sion, As busy as a bee now takes on extra mean­ing for me!

A fas­cin­at­ing talk even though I am not keen on honey.

 

Deadlier than the Male” Chris Dorries OBE 3rd Dec 2018

 Chris Dorries has been Senior Sheffield Coroner since 1991. Sheffield has a high national pro­file with approx­im­ately 3500 cases (40% of all South Yorkshire deaths) repor­ted to the Coroners jur­is­dic­tion annu­ally. Half are referred for con­ven­tional in-house CT autopsy. Sheffield is only one of three UK mor­tu­ar­ies with its own high dose CT scan­ner (a corpse is far more radi­ation tol­er­ant than a patient). Inquests are required in 600 cases on the basis of the autopsy find­ings. A huge reduc­tion in con­ven­tional autopsy fol­lowed the intro­duc­tion of CT. A sur­prise to me was that doc­tors are no longer allowed to be Coroners.

Today’s talk described 4 murder cases illus­trat­ing a recur­ring theme of his­toric cases of women accused of murder and he opened with a verse from a song recor­ded by an obscure Liverpool pop group called Space “The female of the spe­cies is more deadly than the male”, aping a much earlier Rudyard Kipling poem of the same name. Each case was fully repor­ted in news­pa­pers of the times because of huge public interest in female mur­der­ers.

Arsenic, a mining by-product and already known to the Egyptians in 1500BC, was used as a rather subtle murder weapon in the 17–1800s although more com­monly for this pur­pose on the con­tin­ent. It was favoured by females as no viol­ence was required to per­pet­rate, and it was feared by the para­noid. It was largely sold as rat poison, but also employed as a tonic in small doses. Ladies also liked it as an early form of wet wipes for skin and hand cleans­ing. Pharmacies had to record details of sales in the event of foul play. Industrially it was used in the pro­duc­tion of green wall paper. There was ready domestic con­tam­in­a­tion from touch­ing damp walls lined with said paper laden with arsenic.

Acute arsenic pois­on­ing induces vomit­ing, abdom­inal pain, brain prob­lems (enceph­alo­pathy) and bloody diarrhoea, but longer expos­ure gives other nasty things such as skin change, heart dis­ease, pain and diarrhoea and even numb­ness and cancer, most fre­quently from drink­ing water con­tam­in­a­tion, but also expos­ure in mining, agri­cul­tural and toxic waste sites, and wait for it, tra­di­tional medi­cines! No wor­ries then; over­dose gives a slow death likened to “rats gnaw­ing at the insides and insuf­fer­able thirst”.

The case of Mary Blandy

This famous case illus­trated the role of the early cor­oner. She was hanged aged 31 in 1752 for the murder of her father. Disfigured from small­pox, suit­ors were few, but her father advert­ised a dowry equi­val­ent to £10000 today. Enter Captain William Cranstoun, a Scottish aris­to­crat, also rendered ugly from small­pox. It tran­spired that he was already mar­ried with a child in Scotland aiming to annul the mar­riage (or so he said). Mary’s father dis­be­lieved him and ten­sions rose between them. What happened next is unclear. Mary claimed that Cranstoun sent her a love potion (in fact arsenic) asking her to add the powders to father’s tea and gruel and gradu­ally he became symp­to­matic, as did the ser­vants who helped them­selves to the leftovers. All was revealed when the gritty remains in the teacup were iden­ti­fied as arsenic. Mary pan­icked and tried to des­troy the evid­ence (arsenic powder and love let­ters) but a house­maid res­cued some of the powder from the fire­place. Blandy, her father, then died, Mary absconded on the day of the coroner’s inquiry, was chased and caught by a mob. She was sent for trial at Oxford Assizes in 1752 and kept in irons. Although this was the first use of detailed med­ical evid­ence in a trial prov­ing arsenic as the cause of death, the trial lasted just a day and she was hanged 6 weeks later from a low slung beam sup­por­ted between two trees out­side Oxford castle prison (nowadays the Malmaison Hotel and very nice too). Her last request was not to hang her high for the sake of decency. Although it was a public exe­cu­tion, she escaped ana­tomic dis­sec­tion by the skin of her teeth after a par­lia­ment­ary decision to change the Julien to the Gregorian cal­en­dar. Thus eleven days were instantly deleted from the cal­en­dar in September 1752 and the Murder Act was brought for­ward, to pre­cede her exe­cu­tion.

The case of Madeleine Hamilton-Smith

She was a beau­ti­ful but wild woman just 20 years old whose father was a famous Edinburgh archi­tect. She was charged with the murder in 1857 of a former boy­friend, Pierre L’Angelier, who came from Jersey. They met cov­ertly as lovers but the ulterior motive was his wish to marry into money. She then met another suitor and tried to break off the rela­tion­ship. He tried to black­mail her with the threat of show­ing her father the con­tents of love let­ters which expli­citly described their sexual exploits, an abso­lute poten­tial dis­aster in the 1850s.

He threatened sui­cide so for a while she “two timed him” before fatally pois­on­ing him with arsenic-laced cocoa. Cocoa very nicely dis­guises the gritty tex­ture of arsenic in the bottom of the cup. Probus mem­bers were advised to be very wary if ever offered cocoa.

The let­ters were dis­covered and massive amounts of arsenic were found in his body

There was a sen­sa­tional trial in the Edinburgh High Court and she was pub­licly executed at the Royal Mile gal­lows in 1857 in front of 50–100000 people.

There were flaws in the prosecution’s case: she was not allowed to give a sworn state­ment her­self, L’Angelier’s first ill­ness may have pre­ceded the time she pur­chased arsenic, she bought green arsenic but it was white in the body, there was less arsenic than could have been in the “fatal” cocoa com­pared with the amount in his stom­ach, L’Angelier never accused her in front of his land­lady after inges­tion, she would have known the let­ters would be revealed after his death, and sui­cide had already been threatened by him. As a psy­cho­path, intent on sui­cide, he might have been fram­ing her. The case was covered widely and inter­na­tion­ally. A ver­dict of “not proven” was returned and she was dis­charged. She even­tu­ally died in New York in 1928.

The case of Mary Ann Ansell

Mary Ann Ansel (22) was a maid in Bloomsbury. She had a men­tally ill sister in an asylum. She was engaged but there was no money for a mar­riage licence. She took out an insur­ance policy on her sister’s life; for 3d a week she’d get £11 on death. She baked a cake laced with phosphorus-based rat poison and sent it by post to the asylum. Her sister and asylum friends became ill but there was a delay in their assess­ment and treat­ment due to a con­cur­rent typhoid out­break at the asylum. Although the friends recovered, her sister inges­ted a lethal dose.

Delays in med­ical treat­ment were no mit­ig­a­tion for Mary Ann when she was con­victed.  The cake, wrap­per and post mark led back to her. She claimed she had bought rat poison but the mis­tress of the house denied there were rats. The insur­ance policy sealed her guilt and she was executed at St Alban’s prison in 1899

The case of Bloody Babs

Barbara Graham was executed in 1955 at California’s San Quentin gaol. She was per­haps wrongly accused of beat­ing and fatally suf­foc­at­ing an eld­erly woman in a house rob­bery

She was strapped into a chair in the gas cham­ber. A guard patted her knee and asked her to

take a deep breath and it won’t bother you”. She retor­ted “How in the hell would you know?”

 

Chris Dorries is a very enter­tain­ing speaker and reminded us that the right hand rail on the main stairs at the Cutlers Hall was his doing after a diner, worse for wear, fell down the stairs on the way to the lav­at­ory and was fatally injured. At the time there was only a left hand rail and our victim chose the wrong side to come down.

Andrew Shorthouse

3rd December 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harrah for Herr Hundertwasser by Professor Clyde Binfield on 26 November 2018

Clyde Binfield is the Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Sheffield with sev­eral books to his name.  He is also a very accom­plished speaker with both a sense of humour and great curi­os­ity.  Perhaps his love of an artist/architect that was so anti-establishment and a hero of the work­ing man should not come as a sur­prise.

Tourists to Vienna will be aware of this most eccent­ric man, whilst the rest of us may not have heard of him.  Friedrich Stowasser was born in 1928.  In 1948 he joined a Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna only to leave after 3 months and a few months later he changed his name to Hundertwasser

As an artist he was very much influ­enced by the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch but he also had strong “green” sym­path­ies.  He had an aver­sion to the uni­form­ity of straight lines and described modern archi­tec­ture as degen­er­ate.

In his paint­ing of his famous Hundertwasserhaus , the build­ing has no straight lines and green­ery, espe­cially trees pre­dom­in­ate.  At this time when the double helix of DNA was dis­covered, he was paint­ing spir­als.  Through his art he tried to reveal the pos­sib­il­it­ies of a better world with safe envir­on­ment and pro­tec­ted nature

In 1952 he held his first major exhib­i­tion in Vienna.  The main theme in his paint­ings is the recon­cili­ation and har­mony of man­kind with nature.

At the age of 55, he became embroiled with archi­tec­ture.  The above pho­to­graph is a block of social hous­ing now called Hundertwasserhaus.  It is an import­ant build­ing on the Vienna tour­ist cir­cuit and is very pop­u­lar with its occu­pants.  It’s a “make over” of an exist­ing block whose ori­ginal wall can be seen exposed in the left corner.  He appears to have got on well with crafts­men.  The pho­to­graph of a typ­ical bath­room shows how the build­ing has been trans­formed.

In 1959 he became an Associate pro­fessor at Hamburg University.  In 1968 he was lec­tur­ing about the 3 skins.  The 1st. skin is the naked skin, 2nd skin is our clothes and 3rd skin is the home we live in.  At times he would be naked whilst deliv­ery these lec­tures.

Besides paint­ings and build­ings he was famous for his poster and stamp designs.  He made his own clothes and had a pink hat!

He trav­elled extens­ively and spent his later years in New Zealand where he had dual cit­izen­ship and he died whilst cruis­ing on the QE2 in February 2000.

This is a spell bind­ing talk about a man that simply oozes cre­ativ­ity and refuses to be con­strained by rules.

Joined up Heritage Sheffield – Jon Bradley – 19th November 2018

Sheffield, from its begin­nings as a small market town through to today, is a city with an inter­na­tional repu­ta­tion for industry, com­merce and sport steeped in his­tory. It has a her­it­age to be proud of and envied by many. Heritage can be seen as a series of step­ping stones to where we are today, but sadly we don’t make the most of ourselves in com­par­ison to our noisy neigh­bours like Bradford, Leeds and Manchester.

The Botanical Gardens

Joined up Heritage Sheffield is an organ­isa­tion chaired by Jon Bradley and launched in October 2017 with a major aim of making sure our her­it­age is cel­eb­rated loc­ally, region­ally and nation­ally. A broad range of organ­isa­tions and indi­vidu­als rep­res­ent­ing Sheffield’s very diverse her­it­age sector have come together to explore ways to develop a better resourced, better con­nec­ted and better com­mu­nic­ated her­it­age offer to a wide range of audi­ences.

The Bishop’s House

Heritage is big busi­ness, with over 75 per cent of adults vis­it­ing his­tor­ical sites, and it is estim­ated that it is respons­ible for put­ting £20.6 bil­lion into the UK eco­nomy. Tourism is a grow­ing industry, and Sheffield must take full advant­age of its his­tory and repu­ta­tion. History along­side modern set­tings make desir­able places for people to live and work, also attract­ing indus­tries and start-ups. Preserving our her­it­age and his­tor­ical sites also pre­vents the growth of identical, con­crete cities with high rise flats and modern, bland archi­tec­ture.

Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet

Joined up Heritage Sheffield brings together her­it­age part­ners or stake­hold­ers in a co-ordinated and stra­tegic fash­ion. Funds are lim­ited but applic­a­tion has been made to the Charities Commission. The city’s her­it­age must be pro­moted far and wide, and Jon and his asso­ci­ates will need all their pas­sion, com­mit­ment and mar­ket­ing skills to do justice to the his­tory of Sheffield and to achieve any degree of suc­cess. However, there is plenty to cel­eb­rate includ­ing Kelham Island, Bishops’ House, the Botanical Gardens and Abbeydale Industrial Museum, as well as knife, cut­lery and tool man­u­fac­tur­ing, water power, rivers and canals. Beauchief Abbey, the General Cemetery, the Cathedral, Sheffield Castle, Manor Lodge are other examples to inspire and attract vis­it­ors.

Good com­mu­nic­a­tions will be vital, and Joined up Heritage Sheffield is using all means avail­able includ­ing the web­site www.joinedupheritagesheffield.org.uk, news­let­ters, com­munity forums, local his­tory fairs, con­fer­ences and stake­holder (part­ners’) meet­ings to spread the mes­sage. This is a big but worth­while chal­lenge to ensure Sheffield’s his­tory is not for­got­ten but used in a very pos­it­ive way to pro­mote it along­side the vir­tues a very modern city. Today’s Sheffield can be traced back through those step­ping stones to its past. Clearly, Jon and his asso­ci­ates have plenty of her­it­age to join up and mem­bers of Stumperlowe Probus Club wish them suc­cess and await the res­ults with great interest.

Clipper Round the World Race — Martin Greenshields — 12th November 2018

 

THE Clipper Race, first held in 1996–97 and the brainchild of solo round-the-world yachts­man Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, is con­tested by 12 identical yachts, each with a pro­fes­sional skip­per but crewed by a com­bined total of 700 ama­teur sail­ors.

Martin Greenshields is very much one of the ama­teurs. Before embark­ing on this 10,000 naut­ical mile adven­ture of a life­time, his sail­ing exper­i­ence, he admit­ted, con­sisted of one after­noon on Carsington Reservoir.

But  bravely under­tak­ing the first two legs of the global chal­lenge — from Liverpool to Punta del Este in Uruguay, and then back across the Atlantic to Cape Town — wasn’t quite as reck­less as it might at first appear. All the ama­teur crews had to embark on four sep­ar­ate weeks of train­ing at Gosport to turn them from novices to com­pet­ent crew mem­bers, learn­ing the basic skills of seaman­ship as well as under­go­ing sea sur­vival courses and ‘man over­board’ train­ing.

Recruits were then alloc­ated places on one or other of the 12 identical 70-foot ves­sels which make up the world’s largest matched fleet of ocean racing yachts. Martin, a retired account­ant who lives on Redmires Road, was accep­ted for the 2017–18 race as a crew member of the Sanya Serenity Coast, skippered by 53-year-old Australian sailor Wendy Tuck, from Sydney.

The boat, which went on to win the over­all race, was sponsored by the Chinese city of Sanya, a hol­i­day des­tin­a­tion on the south­ern tip of Hainan Island.

Clipper 70s are not for the faint-hearted, or the work shy. They are stripped of all lux­ur­ies. Crew must become experts at hand­ling the boat as well as living in a con­fined space, man­aging all their kit and belong­ings as they settle into their new home. We saw dra­matic onboard foot­age of the yachts encoun­ter­ing massive seas, with the hori­zon tilt­ing crazily.

Martin was quot­ing Sir Robin Knox-Johnston when he said: “In a Clipper 70 you have everything you need to sail around the world, and noth­ing you don’t need.”

The open­ing leg from Liverpool to Punta del Este involved 32 days’ sail­ing, with the 22 crew shar­ing a round-the-clock watch system with the days split into five seg­ments. Off watch, crew mem­bers could catch up on their sleep either on deck or in one of the avail­able bunks .

In the Tropics, the tem­per­at­ure down below could reach 40 deg C, so it wasn’t very good for sleep­ing,” Martin explained. Another obstacle to over­come, espe­cially in the early stages, was sea sick­ness, although Martin man­aged to restrict this to one ses­sion.

As the Sanya Serenity Coast reached halfway on the first leg across the Atlantic, Martin wrote in his diary, pub­lished on the race’s web­site: “The last few days have been noisy, with the con­stant trim­ming of the spin­naker as we seek to squeeze every last knot out of the boat. Now we are through the scor­ing gate, we are on course south to the motor­ing cor­ridor, where we are allowed to turn on the motor for 60 hours, but only 60 hours, to get through the dreaded Doldrums. Once through that, which may be a prob­lem as they are very large this year, it is a ‘sprint’ (prob­ably almost two weeks) to the finish.

The crew have agreed that I can do the blog today to ask you a favour. In a feeble attempt to regain some of the many house points lost recently at home, I did remem­ber to buy a present for my wife for our wed­ding anniversary on Monday. However, I forgot to tell her, or any­body else, where I put it. So, if there is any­body read­ing this who knows Penny, could you please tell her it’s on the seat of the car in the garage? Thanks.”

On Day 27 he wrote: “After what seems like many months at sea, we have noted a dis­tinct change in the morale of the crew. This all eman­ates from the inspir­a­tional words of Wendo [skip­per Wendy Tuck].

Early in the leg, her legendary pep talks went along the lines of ‘just don’t break any­thing.’ As the race con­tin­ued we were given strict instruc­tions, ‘drive it like you stole it.’ Now, how­ever, the time has come for the words we all needed to get us through to Punta. ‘Think of the moji­tos, smell the BBQ.’

With these words we powered ahead, the Doldrums far behind us and all the excite­ment of spin­nakers to keep us occu­pied.”

As we approach the final days of what we under­stand is the longest open­ing leg in Clipper Race his­tory, strange things have been hap­pen­ing on the boat. Jan Riley, our victu­aller has revealed that she is on Mother Duty tomor­row, Sunday, and we are to have roast beef.

She has, appar­ently, secreted all the neces­sary ingredi­ents around the boat and will be gath­er­ing them together for this spe­cial meal. The excite­ment amongst the crew is intense par­tic­u­larly as last night we had chicken curry that con­tained both chicken and curry. To top it off we found the spicy mango chut­ney for the first time so the curry depart­ment is firing on all cyl­in­ders at last.”

Applications are now open for the 2019–20 edi­tion of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race. Please remem­ber to men­tion Stumperlowe Probus Club when sub­mit­ting your entry.

5th Nov 2018 Toujours amis, Toujour unis. The story of the links between Sheffield. Bapaume and Serre by Sylvia Dunkley

This was an appro­pri­ate topic for the cen­ten­ary of the end of the First World War (WW1).

Before the WW1 Bapaume and the nearby hamlet of Serre were pros­per­ous towns and had good schools for edu­ca­tion.

When the war star­ted the town was a stra­tegic object­ive for the German army so they cap­tured it and were still occupy­ing the town in 1917.  The Germans then left and des­troyed all the infra­struc­ture of the area.  They returned later and set up camp in the Town Hall which was still stand­ing and used it for a while.  The Germans booby-trapped the build­ing before leav­ing once more and it was blown up, killing 30 people.

The town hall was rebuilt:

British shelling also con­trib­uted to the dev­ast­a­tion of the town.

Soldiers from the Sheffield Pals were dis­patched to France and their object­ive was to defeat the Germans at Serre.  There was a heavy bom­bard­ment which did not prove effect­ive so the Pals were ordered to “go over the top”.  Of the 600 Pals, 248 were killed, 200 wounded and 18 listed as miss­ing.  British tanks were aban­doned and all the inhab­it­ants of Bapaume left, some later to return living in cel­lars and bombed out houses.

After the war, in the 1920’s, the British League of Help for Devastation of France encour­aged British towns to adopt the bombed towns and Sheffield adop­ted Serre and Bapaume.

Notable Sheffield dig­nat­or­ies, such as Alderman Wardley, took on the task of set­ting up the French aid appeal.  Letters in the Sheffield Telegraph stated that Sheffield shells had des­troyed Bapaume so money-raising pro­jects were star­ted and  £4,800 (£250,000 in today’s money) was raised.  Money was set aside for a crèche and the build­ing of twelve cot­tages for dis­abled cit­izens.

A memorial was erec­ted on the road to Serre vil­lage.  This was in the form of a park and memorial shel­ter.  The shel­ter no longer exists.

Robert Hatfield donated a teak casket con­tain­ing a roll of honour naming 4890 Sheffield men lost in the con­flict.

George Lawrence, a Sheffield busi­ness­man who owned a razor blade fact­ory, provided money for the cause (loc­ally, he built the open-air pools at Hathersage and Longley Park).  He provided money for the crèche and, in July 1939, a party from Sheffield went to open it.  A plaque on the build­ing, com­mem­or­at­ing the con­nec­tion of Sheffield and Bapaume, is still there.

The mayor of Bapaume, Abel Gueidet, thanked the people of Sheffield for their help and presen­ted them with a large Sevres vase which is still in the council’s pos­ses­sion.  The teak casket, donated to Bapaume, was saved from destruc­tion by the wife of a care­taker who took it off a bon­fire and stored it in her attic.

Jackie Drayton, a Sheffield coun­cil­lor, went to Bapaume in 2006, found the memorial park and arranged to ren­ov­ate it.  In 2016 many Sheffield dig­nat­or­ies went to Bapaume to com­mem­or­ate the Battle of the Somme and viewed the refur­bished memorial.

Finally, in March 2018, the Mayor of Bapaume came to Sheffield to thank Sheffield cit­izens for their kind help in help­ing to restore the town, and viewed the large Sevres vase which had been donated by the pre­vi­ous mayor.

The talk was very inter­est­ing and mem­bers asked many ques­tions and some had dis­tant rel­at­ives who had been  in the “War to End All Wars”.

What a shame that wasn’t so, and still after WW2 many lives are still being lost and fam­il­ies made home­less by numer­ous con­flicts all over the world.

Stan Hirst