All posts by Tim Marsh

The Importance of Woodland – Past, Present & Future – Gerald Price – 31st July 2017

The Woodland Trust was formed in 1972 as a char­it­able trust. They now own 1,200 woods cov­er­ing approx­im­ately 75 sqare miles through­out the British Isles, and also work with landown­ers who own their own woods.

With around 300 employ­ees, 300,000 mem­bers and many volun­teers, they are fin­anced equally by legacies, mem­ber­ship, grants, full-time fun­draisers and spon­sors such as Sainsburys, WH Smith and IKEA.

Woodlands are defined as trees, hedges, park­land with trees in them, and any other clusters, copses or clumps of trees. Twelve and a half per cent of the land­scape in Britain is wood­land, and the aim is to reach 25 per cent. Notably, London has 20 per cent wood­land and there are 50 woods within 10 miles of Sheffield.

Trees live the longest of all living things and are the tallest. They are between 20 and 25 per cent carbon, so absorb CO2 from the atmo­sphere and emit O2, as well as provid­ing an essen­tial biod­i­verse hab­itat for 50 per cent of all wild life.

In the canopy of trees, for safety, there are rap­tors, but­ter­flies such as purple emperor and hair­streaks, bats and other creatures. Lower down there are garden birds, other but­ter­flies and mam­mals, while on the ground are mam­mals and flora. In the ground, fungi have a sym­bi­otic arrange­ment with the roots of trees. The roots also hold the soil, aid water per­col­a­tion and take up water, help­ing to pre­vent flood­ing.

Past ancient wood­lands tend to be where plough­ing was dif­fi­cult, so biod­iversity in the wood­land has had time to develop and there­fore con­tains the rarer spe­cies of flora & fauna.

Ancient wood­lands of native spe­cies have been cop­piced for hun­dreds of years, for char­coal, which was needed in steel­mak­ing. They have also been cop­piced for white coal (wood dried, then charred), which was needed for lead smelt­ing, as it burns at a lower tem­per­at­ure. The cop­picing was rotated in a wood and over­seen by a wood ward, who was an import­ant man.

Present object­ives of the Woodland Trust are:

1. Protection — Promoting tree man­age­ment and trying to link up ancient bits, when think­ing of buying. This cre­ates cor­ridors for mam­mals.

2. Restoration – For example, repla­cing pine woods (which were planted after WW1 by the newly formed Forestry Commission to provide wood for com­mer­cial use, and are dark and unat­tract­ive to the flora and fauna) with woods of oak and native spe­cies, which are light, airy and more biod­i­verse, attract­ing flora & fauna.

3. Creation – Planting new trees by donat­ing young sap­lings to com­munit­ies, and work­ing with the com­munit­ies to plant on any bits of public land that cannot be used for any­thing else.

4. Control of pests and dis­eases – There are 19 threats at present, includ­ing dis­eased chest­nut trees and ash die-back. It is likely we will lose all our ash trees which is the second most pop­u­lous tree.

Future object­ives are described in the Woodland Trust’s new ‘Charter for Trees, Woods & People’ which will be launched on 7th November 2017, which is the 800th anniversary of the ‘Charter of the Forest’ in 1217 (around the time of the Magna Carta) which recog­nised that the peas­ants had rights over the woods too.

Some 70,000 sig­na­tures of sup­port for the new charter have been col­lec­ted to date, and 100,000 is the target.

The 10 object­ives are:

1. Thriving hab­it­ats for diverse spe­cies
2. Planting for the future
3. Celebrating the cul­tural impact of trees
4. Thriving forestry sector that deliv­ers for the UK
5. Better pro­tec­tion for import­ant trees & woods (TPOs)
6. Enhancing new devel­op­ments with trees
7. Understanding and using the nat­ural health bene­fits of trees
8. Access to trees for every­one, with paths
9. Addressing threats to trees and woods through good man­age­ment
10. Strengthening land­scapes with woods and trees

The Woodland Trust are doing essen­tial and very valu­able work to main­tain and improve our wood­lands an d envir­on­ment for the bene­fit of all.

Gerald gave us an excel­lent present­a­tion, and encour­aged us to sup­port the Woodland Trust and get involved. For fur­ther inform­a­tion see www.woodlandtrust.org.uk

Inspector Hopkinson’s Discovery — Ian Morgan — 12th June 2017

Ian, a renowned local his­tor­ian, who has appeared on TV & radio, told us the story of a mul­tiple murder, in Mansfield, that occurred in the early hours of 11th August 1895.
Henry Wright (H.W.) the lodger, had, allegedly, murdered his land­lady, Mary Reynolds aged 48, her 2 chil­dren, Big William & Charles, aged 15 & 17, & her grand­son, Little William aged 2.
Mary was wid­owed but had been mar­ried twice. Her last hus­band had died in 1890.
Also in the house on that night, but who sur­vived, were George (Marys elder stepson) & her grand­son Little Robert, who was only there for the one night.
At 1.50am Inspector Hopkinson, living over the police sta­tion, was awakened by H. W. ham­mer­ing on the door of the police sta­tion, with his throat cut as far as his wind­pipe, stark naked, covered in blood, hold­ing Little Robert in his arms, who was on fire.
Hopkinson doused the burn­ing clothes, phoned for the doctor, & band­aged Wrights throat. Wright not able to speak, poin­ted down the road. Hopkinson recog­nised that Wright lived 50 yards down the road, blew his whistle for back-up, & ran down the road to where the house was on fire.
A police Officer Steadman came to the sta­tion & recog­nised Wright as someone he had spoken to 2 hours earlier. He pro­ceeded to the burn­ing house. The doctor came to Wright & stitched up his wind­pipe, whereupon Wright con­fessed that he had killed them all & set the house on fire. The doctor took Little Robert to Mrs. Hopkinson & Wright con­fessed to her as well, that he had killed them all.
At the scene of the fire, even­tu­ally, the fire bri­gade arrived. The front door was found to be locked, & the back door jammed partly open. Neighbours kicked in the front door. The first floor front room was locked, & in the first floor back room Marys 2 chil­dren were found dead with their throats cut. The 2 rooms on the top floor had their doors roped together closed, so no-one could get out. The front room was sub­sequently found to be empty, once the rope had been cut, & George was in the back room, & had escaped through the window, by ladder, with the help of Steadman.
Mary Reynolds was found dead in the kit­chen, dis­em­bowelled, block­ing the door.
The murder weapon & the razor which H.W. tried to commit sui­cide with, by cut­ting his throat, were found in the house.
The fire was put out after 7 hours & Little Williams charred body was then found.
Wright was taken to the Infirmary under guard, assessed but not passed fit for trial for 10 weeks as he some­times went into a trance, seemed ter­ri­fied, in des­pair & had fits which were ques­tioned as being fake.
At the Inquest, the day after the crime, there was con­flict­ing evid­ence as some said there was no alco­hol on his breath, but others repor­ted that they had been drink­ing with him, & it tran­spired that he had a his­tory of fits which some deemed to be fake.
The jury vis­ited the scene, took photos, & noted there had been a fight in the kit­chen.

After this the 4 funer­als took place, with emo­tions run­ning high & at one funeral George fein­ted & the crowd turned against Wright.

At the first com­mit­tal hear­ing Wright was dishevelled, dirty, hold­ing his head between his legs & he made no plea or com­ment when deman­ded to respond to whether guilty or not. He rushed out part way through the pro­ceed­ings & was there­fore charged as guilty & sent to jail, to await trial. Mansfield could now get back to ‘normal’.

At the trial, Wrights father, who had a fruit & veg. shop, which was about to be demol­ished, said his son had been stu­di­ous, but after an acci­dent which had occurred in the past & dam­aged his head, he was never the same again. He ended up work­ing as a labourer in an iron foundry, wasn’t very bright & was the butt of jokes from his fellow work­ers. He joined a mil­it­ary estab­lish­ment, went to camps, but was dis­missed after he had fits on a few occa­sions. After his mother died his atti­tude changed, he did noth­ing at home, so was told to leave & he ended up as a lodger with Mary Reynolds in 1890.
In 1893, George the stepson came to live with his step­mother & had to share a bed­room with H. W.. George had had a 12 year career in the army in India, had got a medal for the battles he had fought, had suffered from gonor­rhoea, syph­ilis, chol­era etc & had been treated with injec­tions of mer­cury.
On the night of 10/8/1895, H.W. & Mary Reynolds met, & George joined them later, but, in the even­ing, Henry Wright went for a drink with a mate & met police officer Steadman on the way home. He seemed to be no worse for drink.

The gov­ernor of the prison where H.W. was being held, had writ­ten that there was some­thing not right with H.W.
A spe­cial­ist was called who declared that H.W. was insane at the time of the crime, pos­sibly due to the effect of alco­hol.
The chief of Broadmoor also classed H.W. as insane brought on pos­sibly by alco­hol.
H.W. made no plea of guilty, or not guilty or even that he was a hom­icidal maniac. He never defen­ded him­self, except when Mary Reynolds step­daugh­ter gave evid­ence that he was a viol­ent man, at which point H.W. shouted that she was a liar & was afraid to go home because she was afraid of her hus­band. This was the only time he said any­thing.
The judge had a repu­ta­tion of being tough & the jury took 18 minutes to find H.W. guilty.
H.W. was a beaten man & only once asked to see the father of the young­est victim, but he went to the gal­lows on 24/12/1895.

After this tragic epis­ode we were told that all those involved, includ­ing Inspector Hopkinson, came to a wretched & untimely death. Little Robert died of scar­let fever after 3 months. George became an alco­holic & thief & ended up in jail & the work­house & the same infirm­ary as H.W. & died aged 35 in 1897 of ema­ci­ation.
In 1900 the neigh­bour who helped, died at 48, & Doctor Godfrey died at 39 years of age. The fire chief died in 1903 & Insp. Hopkinson died after a crash on his pony & trap, from shock at 48 years of age.
The police officers involved & the exe­cu­tion­ers & assist­ants, also all came to a sticky pre­ma­ture end.
11/8/1895 was a trau­matic night for all con­cerned, with far reach­ing con­sequences.

Ian kept us all con­cen­trat­ing on this very inter­est­ing, well researched & delivered talk.

Geoff Barwick – Part 2 — 27 March 2017

Our Treasurer, who spoke in Part 1 about his National Service days in an RAF band, agreed at short notice, to enter­tain us with fur­ther yarns of his time in the Service, because the sched­uled speaker had become inca­pa­cit­ated. Geoff poin­ted out that he had obvi­ously not been first choice, as the Chairman admit­ted he had made sev­eral tele­phone calls before con­tact­ing Geoff.

Not fond of school, Geoff left at 16 with 5 ‘O’ levels and ended up in Local Authority employ­ment, which didn’t suit him.

National Service called, and as he had been in the Boys Brigade play­ing and win­ning accol­ades in the band from ages 11 to 19, he found him­self in the RAF band.

Advised to apply for a com­mis­sion, he went to Uxbridge for a week­ends activ­it­ies and inter­view. Imagining him­self as a pilot when issued with new kit, he had to solve prob­lems and give a talk. He was unsuc­cess­ful, so, gave up fur­ther applic­a­tions.

Reflecting on times in his billet, shared with many others, espe­cially the first 6 weeks, when they were not allowed off the camp, there were:-

Bull’ nights when the Sergeant came to inspect the clean­li­ness of the billet and layout of each per­sons equip­ment, which had to be in a pre­scribed order. Some were verbally sav­aged, and had their belong­ings strewn around the billet. The rest thanked their lucky stars that they hadn’t been treated the same way.

Beret’ nights. The troops were instruc­ted to wear wel­ling­ton boots and beret over their pyja­mas, in bed, for a pos­sible fire drill at mid­night. This, of course, was a hoax, to much amuse­ment from  the older troops return­ing from the pub, to see a line of men scrab­bling out of a billet and lining up in their pyja­mas, boots and beret, in the response to the fire alarm. Geoff missed this indig­nity by sleep­ing through the alarm.

Applying to swap his post­ing from Helmsley to Gainsborough, and although warned, he ended up being posted abroad to Omaha, Nebraska, for 6 weeks. This was a con­tinu­ally busy air­port with big planes coming and going on their way to and from N.Canada. The bil­lets were sited at the end of the runway, with con­stant noise and vibra­tion. Sleep depriva­tion meant on one occa­sion he slept through 4 films until 6am, at an all-night movie in a car park.

On his return, Geoff worked in Bomber Command as an Accountant at RAF Honnington, near Thetford. Managing to ‘wangle’ his work to allow each week­end to be a long one, he recoun­ted tales of how he got to Sheffield from East Anglia before Motorways, by hitch­ing, cadging lifts, in dodgy cars, and some­times in much dis­com­fort.

Eventually posted to Germany, with his wife, he bought an old Ford Popular, traded his cigar­ette coupons for petrol coupons, put 4 large full petrol cans in the boot, bought at 1/6d per gallon, and toured Europe, includ­ing a stay under the 1925 Olympic ski jump at Innsbruck. The cour­age of those who jumped off, remains with him.

A final remin­isce was of a Squadron Leader with a severe limp lead­ing the troops not in a straight line, but with a bit of ‘left hand down’ because of his dis­ab­il­ity.

A nat­ural racon­teur, Geoff kept us well enter­tained with this and other yarns. A very worthy replace­ment for the sched­uled speaker, he was warmly thanked.

 

The Porthole Murder – C.P.Dorries O.B.E. — 23rd January 2017.

Christopher Dorries, the Senior Coroner for Sheffield and Barnsley, was on his second visit to us.
This time, he delivered a talk on the so-called ‘Porthole Murder,’ when a 21-year old girl called Gay Gibson (her stage name) dis­ap­peared from the MV Durban Castle, a 17,000-ton cruise ship, in 1947, in shark infes­ted waters 90 miles off the West African coast on a voyage from South Africa to Southampton.
The murder trial included a beau­ti­ful act­ress, sex, a ‘ladies’ man’ deck stew­ard who pur­sued her, and a body which dis­ap­peared without trace from the small 80 sq ft cabin, No 126, which had a 17’’ dia­meter open­ing porthole.
Gay Gibson, born in India in 1926, did war ser­vice in the ATS and Intelligence branch. When she was dis­charged from the forces she was given a med­ical and passed as fully fit with a normal heart rhythm (evid­ence rel­ev­ant to the trial). She had aspir­a­tions to be on the stage, and after the war she went to stay with her par­ents in South Africa.

She joined a trav­el­ling show, worked and played hard and had an affair which led her to seek advice on con­tra­cep­tion from a doctor (this led to sup­pos­i­tion that she may have thought later that she was preg­nant). There was also a report at that time that she had fein­ted whilst having sex (another rel­ev­ant fact in the trial). The show she was appear­ing in closed down and, on Friday 10th October 1947, she boarded the Durban Castle, bound for the UK.
James Camb – 31 years old, mar­ried with a child — had served on Arctic con­voys during WW2 and was a deck stew­ard (bar hand) on the Durban Castle. He had a repu­ta­tion as a ladies’ man who desired ‘female con­quests.’
Gay Gibson was in First Class, prob­ably paid for by someone else (her lover who had made her pos­sibly preg­nant). James Camb was not per­mit­ted to go to the cabin areas, but he pur­sued her nev­er­the­less and was once seen tres­passing in those areas.
On 17th October, after dining with two friends she had met on board, Gay went to her cabin and was never seen again. The cabin maid raised the alarm the next day when there was no sign of her, her pyja­mas or long dress­ing gown.
During the night of the 17th/18th at 2.48am, both stew­ards’ but­tons in cabin 126 (one for a female stew­ard, one for a male stew­ard) were vig­or­ously pressed. No stew­ards were on duty, but the night­watch­man heard the bells and because both had been pressed he thought it was urgent, so within one minute he was there and opened the door ajar without knock­ing. He saw what he knew to be James Camb’s arm and knew Cambs’ voice when he said ‘’It’s OK. Everything is alright.” He assumed that, with the man’s repu­ta­tion, it was just another of his female affairs, so he went away. However, he went to the cap­tain and repor­ted the incid­ent, but did not men­tion James Camb by name, so the Captain thought it was just a lovers’ tiff and dis­missed it as not some­thing to inter­fere with.
When a search of the ship the next day didn’t find the girl, the night­watch­man then men­tioned James Camb, who was ques­tioned and denied any know­ledge of the situ­ation. He claimed he was being vic­tim­ised, but his mates did not believe him, espe­cially because of his repu­ta­tion, and he was unusu­ally wear­ing long sleeved shirts which covered scratches on his arms, which he said was prickly rash. He was how­ever arres­ted in the UK on 25th October 1947 and ini­tially just allowed to talk to explain his actions.
However, after ques­tion­ing began and he had picked up on the fact that Ms Gibson had allegedly in the past fein­ted whilst having sex, he said: ‘’So she might have died of a heart attack and not been murdered’’. He then admit­ted that he had been to see her as she had asked for a drink in her cabin. She had let him in, wear­ing only a long dress­ing gown and she had agreed to have sex, during which she went limp. He thought she had had a seizure. He pan­icked and put her through the porthole (it was proved in court that this was pos­sible) and then returned to his own cabin and pre­ten­ded noth­ing had happened.

The evid­ence against him was that he didn’t make any effort to get help, and merely gave her arti­fi­cial res­pir­a­tion for more than 30 minutes although he had no real idea how to do that. If he had thought she had died of nat­ural causes, why didn’t he leave the body for a post mortem? Stains on the sheets were pos­sibly com­men­sur­ate with death by stran­gu­la­tion. Why throw an unused pair of pyja­mas out of the porthole if she was naked, as he said?
He had changed his story and lied. The jury took 45 minutes to find him guilty. Further damning stor­ies then sur­faced about his pre­vi­ous beha­viour. He was sen­tenced to hang, but Parliament was debat­ing a repeal of the hanging bill at that time and his sen­tence was changed to life impris­on­ment. He was released in 1958.
In 1971 he was con­victed of assault­ing young girls and served a fur­ther seven years in prison. He was released in 1978, but died in 1979.
There are murders today at sea, though usu­ally to do with drug run­ning. Chris assured us that, although recor­ded hom­icides in the 1880s were the same as now, crime is down and the length of sen­tences are up.
We will no doubt be invit­ing Chris to return to give us another talk, but prob­ably not the one he gives to lady audi­ences ‘’The Quickest Way to a Mans’ Heart is with a Bread Knife’’.
It was a very grip­ping morn­ing.

The Plague Doctor from Eyam – David Bell – 7th November 2016.

Although David is not a doctor, his­tor­ian or aca­demic, he retired to Eyam and dis­covered that the water­fall on the farm he had bought, was the site where  a Matthew Morton had taken up res­id­ence, in 1665, with his dog ‘Flash’, to escape the plague, which had killed his wife – or was it?

When bus loads of tour­ists turned up to view the water­fall and learn about the plague his­tory of Eyam (whether myth or real­ity), David decided to research those times and events in the vil­lage.     The con­clu­sion was that the stor­ies com­monly told would appear to have been embel­lished  over the cen­tur­ies, but, how­ever, have done no harm for tour­ism.

So David has unearthed a few tales of his own, to throw into the pot.

With the props David had brought with him, includ­ing a blow-up Samuel Pepys doll, par­tially dressed in 17th cen­tury clothes, which had a urin­ary tract infec­tion, a blad­der stone and con­stip­a­tion, we knew we were in for an enter­tain­ing morn­ing. What  fol­lowed were buttock-clenching descrip­tions of the cures for ail­ments doc­u­mented in Samuel Pepys diar­ies – which David graph­ic­ally demon­strated on the dummy.

With ‘doc­tors’ in that era a mix­ture of Alan Titchmarsh, Mystic Meg and Russell Grant, ail­ments were remedied with plants that looked like the shape of the body organs infec­ted, which per­haps sur­pris­ingly, did seem to have some rel­ev­ant ingredi­ents, and con­coc­tions of which David avidly inges­ted, seem­ingly without ill effect.

These ‘doc­tors’, how­ever, deser­ted London at the time of the plague and gave rise to ‘plague doc­tors’ with equally bizarre and dan­ger­ous rem­ed­ies, depend­ing on how much you could afford, with the result that 100,000 people died.

The plague came to Eyam in a con­sign­ment of cloth from London, which had plague fleas in the cloth, so people star­ted to get infec­ted and die. 260 suc­cumbed in total, over 14 months.

Many tales about the plague have ensued over the last 350 years, based on records and recol­lec­tions from the few who lived, some of whom were very young at the time.

The pivotal story of the vicar, William Mompesson, who told his parish­ion­ers to stay in the vil­lage, not to mix or meet in public, and who were sub­sequently self­lessly sac­ri­ficed to the plague, has likely been embel­lished down the years, as records show that Mompesson had sent his 2 sons to Sheffield, before he spoke to his parish­ion­ers. Records also sug­gest that the Duke (at that time Earl) of Devonshire forced the vil­la­gers to be con­fined to Eyam by using armed guards.

We were left well enter­tained, def­in­itely grate­ful for the NHS, and bemused as to how much the offi­cial Eyam plague his­tory has been embel­lished.

A very unusual, amus­ing and inter­est­ing morn­ing much appre­ci­ated by the mixed audi­ence, prior to their Annual Lunch.

 

 

Crime Protection for the over 60’s — Andy Foster – 19 September 2016.

Andy, who is not a police­man, but works for the South Yorkshire Police in the Community Safety Dept. is clearly ded­ic­ated and com­mit­ted to Crime Reduction.

Along with giving talks to the gen­eral public on crime aware­ness, sup­port­ing vic­tims of crime, detect­ing crime and liais­ing with other author­it­ies, he works at the Lifewise Centre at Hellaby, Rotherham, (www.lifewise999.co.uk) where there is a mock up for learn­ing inter­act­ively through real­istic crime scen­arios delivered in a life­like street scene, and where chil­dren are reg­u­lar vis­it­ors to their Crucial Crew events.

Operation Liberal’ has been launched to raise aware­ness of crime among the over-60’s. These include muggings/robberies, rogue traders, fraud/scams, cyber crime, and dis­trac­tion burg­lary. Of all these, Distraction Burglary is the worst, and com­mit­ted mainly by people who travel from a dis­tance. The trauma felt by vic­tims can be dev­ast­at­ing.

Criminals are always on the look-out for oppor­tun­it­ies and signs of home secur­ity lapses. They target the vul­ner­able, the old, the lonely, or dis­abled. Any evid­ence of old folk, like hand­rails and signs, is a giveaway.

Andy gave us inform­a­tion and examples of crimin­al­ity in abund­ance, among which was an example of dis­trac­tion burg­lary on a 92 year old lady. Someone posing as a ‘Water  Board’ Inspector (which no longer exists) who needed access to her prop­erty, enabled a large theft to take place, when she was not look­ing. The solu­tion is to refuse anyone entry, or pre­tend you have a Police Officer in the house, or to use the Yorkshire Water scheme called ‘Helping Hands’ where the house­holder has to ask the inspector for a pass­word.

If it’s a Police Officer at the door, keep the chain on the door, and ask for the collar number, where they are based and who is their boss and then check it out.  Always ask for I.D.

An example of prop­erty repair main­ten­ance was a rogue trader, who offered kindly to replace one roof tile for £50, which ulti­mately became 10 tiles for £500. The work­men then became aggress­ive until they paid up.

The major­ity of rob­ber­ies are com­mit­ted on the  17 to 23 year old. Students who are not street wise, have expens­ive mobile phones, and lead a life which makes them vul­ner­able.

Fraud or Scams can be either by tele­phone, post or inter­net.

Think Jessica’ (www.(thinkjessica.com/marilyns-story) is a cam­paign star­ted by Marilyn Baldwin , Jessica Baldwin’s daugh­ter, in 2007, to raise aware­ness about postal and tele­phone fraud. Criminals brain­wash vul­ner­able people by bom­bard­ing them with offers and psy­cho­lo­gic­ally con­vin­cing them it is true. Telephone hand­sets can have ‘Call Blocker’ built into them and mail can be re-directed. Another tele­phone pref­er­ence system is ‘True Call’ (www.truecall.co.uk), and using an answerphone is another ploy.

Internet fraud can come in many forms such as Romance scams, stolen iden­tit­ies, PayPal scams, bank scams and Microsoft com­puter virus scams.

Charities can be aggress­ive and pester people to commit to Direct Debits, and then sell on the details of con­trib­ut­ors to other char­it­ies who will target cer­tain age groups. If you ask for quotes for insur­ance, for example, your details are sold on to other groups who then bom­bard you with their lit­er­at­ure.

For home secur­ity, alarms which can be set at night are good, and PIR sensors which can dis­tin­guish whether you have a pet  are avail­able. Dogs free to roam in the house are a deterrent, but a nosy neigh­bor is useful. Fake CCTV or alarm boxes are not very effect­ive.          When on hol­i­day it is advis­able to set the alarm, leave some lights to come on with timers, and get your neigh­bor to park in your drive. At Christmas, over­flow­ing bins with evid­ence of recent pur­chases will make crim­in­als target you.  For door locks, there is a Company called ‘’Stay Put’’ (see www.yorkshirehousing.co.uk) which will fit locks very cheaply. TS007 3star anti-snap Euro pro­file cyl­in­der locks are the best for u PVC doors.

Andy had leaf­lets and much inform­a­tion to impart and could easily have con­tin­ued for another hour, but we all appre­ci­ated the insight and reminder of the often ignored dangers around us.

A very worth­while  and enjoy­able morn­ings talk, expertly delivered.